The [AT] Connects Blog

National Survey Shows People with Disabilities Are Striving to Work & Overcoming Barriers

Posted By Anne Long | Jun 05, 2015

National Survey Shows People with Disabilities Are Striving to Work & Overcoming Barriers

The 2015 Kessler Foundation "National Employment and Disability Survey" has found that nearly 69 percent of Americans with disabilities are working, actively preparing for employment or looking for jobs. Barriers to work include lack of education or training opportunities, transportation issues and employer attitudes. The survey also found that having a flexible work schedule (flexible start and end times, work at home, taking more breaks) was one of the most important workplace accommodations. The survey includes responses from more than 3,000 working-age Americans with disabilities.

For more information about recruiting and hiring people with disabilities, career planning and job training, and job accommodations that can help people with disabilities succeed in the workplace, read Disability.gov’s Guide to Employment.


"My Disability Is One Part of Who I Am"

Posted By Anne Long | May 07, 2015

Disability.gov updates

2015 Theme Announced for October’s National Disability Employment Awareness Month

"My Disability Is One Part of Who I Am" is the theme for this year’s National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). The U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy announced the official theme for the October observance. NDEAM is a nationwide effort that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the contributions of America's workers with disabilities.

RJ Mitte, TV actor, brown hair, cerebral palsy, My disability is only one part of who I am

For more information about recruiting and hiring people with disabilities, job accommodations and where to get help with your job search, be sure to check out

Disability.gov’s Guide to Employment.

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The Work Opportunity Tax Credit News

Posted By Anne Long | May 04, 2015

EDI Logo

The Work Opportunity Tax Credit News

The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) has been reauthorized to cover the 2014 lapse, retroactive to December 31, 2013. Although WOTC has not yet been reauthorized for 2015, State Workforce Agencies will continue to accept applications in anticipation of another retroactive authorization for 2015. Read the full guidance letter.

What is WOTC?

A Federal tax credit for employers who hire and retain veterans and individuals with significant barriers to employment. Employers claim about $1 billion in tax credits each year under this program. There is no limit on the number of individuals hired to qualify for the tax credit and a few simple steps to apply.
Learn more about WOTC from the US Department of Labor.

To learn more about the many tax benefits for businesses who hire individuals with disabilities, visit the IRS information page.

For questions about disability employment practices and policies or to learn more about customized training and consultation contact us:
Email: employerpractices@cornell.edu
Or fill out the request form on our website.


Grants for Adaptive Sports Programs for Disabled Veterans and Disabled Members of the Armed Forces

Posted By Anne Long | Mar 24, 2015

Department of Veterans Affairs

Grants for Adaptive Sports Programs for Disabled Veterans and Disabled Members of the Armed Forces

Deadline: May 26, 2015

Award Ceiling: $500,000

http://www.va.gov/adaptivesports/va_grant_program.asp

The Adaptive Sports Grant (ASG) Program’s purpose is to provide grants to eligible adaptive sports entities to plan, develop, manage, and implement programs to provide adaptive sports activities for disabled Veterans and disabled members of the Armed Forces. Adaptive sports activities means: (1) instruction, participation, and competition in adaptive sports; (2) training and technical assistance to program administrators, coaches, recreation therapists, instructors, VA employees, and other appropriate individuals; and (3) coordination, Paralympic classification of athletes, athlete assessment, sport-specific training techniques, program development (including programs at the local level), sports equipment, supplies, program evaluation, and other activities related to the implementation and operation of the program. B. Funding Priorities: The overriding goal is to ensure that appropriate levels of resources are provided to eligible adaptive sports entities with the greatest capabilities to provide adaptive sports activities that meet the current needs and priorities for disabled Veterans and disabled members of the Armed Forces as described in the ASG Program goals and objectives and provides adaptive sports activities in geographic regions where VA has identified limited sports opportunities for disabled Veterans and disabled members of the Armed Forces as further described in V.A.2.(g) below. C. Approach: Grantees will be expected to leverage adaptive sports grant funds to provide adaptive sports activities for disabled Veterans and disabled members of the Armed Forces. In doing so, grantees are required to establish outreach programs including active liaison with VA, Department of Defense, State, local and tribal governments; and Veterans Services Organizations (VSOs), private agencies, and organizations as detailed under 77.11. 


Futures of Disabilities: Is Technology Failing Us?

Posted By Anne Long | Feb 05, 2015
http://scholarworks.csun.edu/handle/10211.3/133380

This paper examines possible reasons why technology may not be living up to its promise for some people with disabilities (including poor policy implementation, low accessibility, cost, disinterest, lack of awareness, prejudice) and describes preliminary results from the first round of a futures-oriented Delphi survey.   


Wireless Technology Uses and Activities by People with Disabilities

Posted By Anne Long | Feb 05, 2015

http://scholarworks.csun.edu/handle/10211.3/133373

Access to and use of wireless consumer technology (e.g., mobile devices like cellphones, smartphones, tablets, software and services) has become ever more critical to social and economic participation, particularly for people with disabilities. Rates of ownership of wireless devices among people with disabilities have risen considerably in recent years, narrowing substantially the gap in ownership rates with the general population. But what do people with disabilities actually do with their wireless devices? This article presents findings from the Survey of User Needs (SUN), a national survey on use and usability of mainstream wireless technology by people with disabilities. Data from the most recent SUN conducted in 2012-2013 will be presented, focusing on the wireless activities of people with disabilities. Data on the following uses will be analyzed: accessing the internet, text messaging, emailing, downloading and using mobile apps, social networking, using GPS and location based services. Results show that as a group, people with disabilities and use wireless services at rates similar to the general population. However, substantial variation exists in use of some services between disability types, mainly those with hearing, speech or vision loss.